Essays & reportage

Behind the mulga curtain

Tennant Creek has developed innovative ways of dealing with the strengths and weaknesses of social media, writes Eleanor Hogan. But the initiatives are languishing, partly for lack of funding

11 Jul 14 |

The battle of Mort Street

By the time the first edition of the Australian hit the streets almost fifty years ago, a vital part of Rupert Murdoch’s strategy had already run into trouble, writes Peter Browne

06 Jul 14 |

What should Labor stand for?

The best way forward for Labor doesn’t fit well with structures inherited from the past, writes Geoff Gallop

04 Jul 14 |

How American servicemen found Ernestine Hill in their kitbags

Blending journalism, romance and travelogue, The Great Australian Loneliness crossed a different set of borders during the second world war, writes Anna Johnston

27 Jun 14 |

Unlawful deliveries

Babies born in detention are taking the federal government to court. Meanwhile, being locked up is making their parents dangerously ill, writes Peter Mares

26 Jun 14 |

How Thomas Piketty found a mass audience, and what it means for public policy

Thomas Piketty’s phenomenally successful Capital confirms that Western countries are becoming less equal. John Quiggin looks at how he fits into a long-running debate about inequality, and finds some encouraging signs

30 May 14 |

Not suitable for children

Helen Simpson’s Under Capricorn made a decades-long journey from novel to film to TV to DVD. Alfred Hitchcock’s version was a revealing stop-off along the way, writes Tanya Dalziell

|

Unravelling “Australia’s own McCarthy era”

For years the Labor Party clung to the belief that the defection of Vladimir Petrov was orchestrated by the Menzies government to influence the result of the 1954 election. Jack Waterford looks at what really happened during those remarkable months sixty years ago

|