The rise and fall of Labor’s first party professional

Cyril Wyndham, the energetic, reformist outsider, changed forever the way Labor organised itself federally, writes Stephen Mills. And then he paid the price for pursuing an independent line

21 Jul 14 | Comments (0)

How American servicemen found Ernestine Hill in their kitbags

Blending journalism, romance and travelogue, The Great Australian Loneliness crossed a different set of borders during the second world war, writes Anna Johnston

27 Jun 14 | Comments (0)

The surgeon as bad-tempered hero

Frank Bowden decodes an unsettling memoir of life in and beyond the operating theatre

20 Jun 14 | Comments (0)

Letting us in on her secret

Best known for her undercover exposé Nickel and Dimed, Barbara Ehrenreich ventures into entirely different territory in her new book, writes Sara Dowse

12 Jun 14 | Comments (2)

Just because you’re paranoid doesn’t mean they aren’t after you

Emily Crawford reviews Glenn Greenwald’s account of the Snowden affair

06 Jun 14 | Comments (1)

Labor’s history wars roll on

Paralysed leader or bad advice? Stephen Mills reviews a new account of the Rudd–Gillard government and what it says about the party’s future

04 Jun 14 | Comments (5)

The lack of men, the lack of reinforcement, the lack of munitions

Phillip Schuler’s dispatches from Gallipoli captured the horror and the heroism for Australian readers, writes Mark Baker

03 Jun 14 | Comments (0)

How Thomas Piketty found a mass audience, and what it means for public policy

Thomas Piketty’s phenomenally successful Capital confirms that Western countries are becoming less equal. John Quiggin looks at how he fits into a long-running debate about inequality, and finds some encouraging signs

30 May 14 | Comments (1)